Bibliography

Any bibliography is out of date as soon as it is issued but this one in 2011 will direct you to reputable books and further references. Reputable journal articles would be available via searches in university library data bases such as Academic Search Premier.

Use this list as a base for exploring a rich history of principled activities, especially regarding Canadian experience.

PART I
Women and social activism

  • Acker, A. & Brightwell, B. (2004). Off our rockers and into trouble: The Raging Grannies. Victoria, BC: Touchwood Editions.
  • Ackelsberg, M. A. (2009). Resisting citizenship: Feminist essays on politics, community, and democracy. London/New York: Routledge.
  • Albert, M. (2002). The trajectory of change: Activist strategies for social transformation. Cambridge, MA: South End Press.
  • Alston, J.A. & McClellan, P.A. (2011). Herstories: Leading with the lessons of the lives of Black women activists New York, NY: Peter Lang.
  • Anderson, D. (1996). Rebel daughter: An autobiography. Toronto: Key Porter.
  • Baumgardner, J. & Richards, A. (2005). Grassroots: A field guide for feminist activism. New York, NY: Farrar, Straus & Giroux.
  • Blake, J. & Westlund, J. (2006). The mobilization of older feminists: Women elders in action (WE*ACT) Campaign for Pension Reform. Canadian Woman Studies, 25 (3/4), 149 +5pgs.
  • Blee, K.M. (1998). No middle ground: Women and radical protest. New York, NY: New York University Press.
  • Bruce, E. M. (2006). Theological education for social ministry: Proposals based on a narrative inquiry. Journal of Adult Theological Education, 3 (2), 114-128.
  • Butterwick, S. & Selman, J. (2006). Embodied metaphors: Telling feminist coalition stories through popular theatre. New Zealand Journal of Adult Learning, 34 (2), 42-58.
  • Butterwick, S. (1998). Lest we forget: Uncovering women’s leadership in adult education. In Selman, G., Cooke, M., Selman, M., & Dampier, P. The foundations of adult education in Canada (2nd ed.) (pp. 103-116). Toronto, ON: Thompson Educational Publishing.
  • Caissie, L.T. (2010). The Raging Grannies: Narrative construction of gender and aging. In G. Kenyon, E., Bohlmeijer, & W. L. Randall (eds.), Storying later life: Issues, investigations, and interventions in narrative gerontology. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • Carr, D. (2010). Sanctuary: The story of naturalist Mary Majka. Fredericton, NB: Goose Lane Editions.
  • Clague, M., with L. Kemp & J. Huntly. (2009). Staying true, staying the course: Lessons from 10 successful community service organizations in British Columbia, 1997-2008. Harrowsmith, ON: The Carold Institute & Langara College, BC.[ http://www.carold.ca/home/publicationenx]
  • Cockburn, C. (2007). From where we stand: War, women's activism and feminist analysis. London/New York: Zed Books.
  • Crocco, M.S., Munro, P. & Weiler, K. (1999). Pedagogies of resistance: Women educator activists, 1880-1960. New York, NY: Teachers College Press.
  • Cullen-Dupont, K. (2002). American women activists’ writings: An anthology 1637-2002. New York, NY: Cooper Square Press.
  • Doyle, J. (2006). Transformations: The life of Margaret Fulton, Canadian feminist, educator and social activist. Toronto: ECW Press.
  • English, L.M. (2005). Third-space practitioners: Women educating for justice in the global south. Adult Education Quarterly, 55 (2), 85-100.
  • Fairhall, D. (2006). Common ground: The story of Greenham. London: I. B. Tauris.
  • Fosl, C. (2008). Anne Braden, Fannie Lou Hamer, and Rigoberta Menchu: Using personal narratives to build activist movements. In Solinger, R., Fox, M. & Irani, K. (eds.) Telling stories to change the world: Global voices on the power of narrative to build community and make social justice claims (pp. 217-226). London: Routledge.
  • George, G.R. (2000). The rock where we stand: An ethnography of women’s activism in Newfoundland. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Green, J. (ed.) (2007). Making space for indigenous feminism. Halifax, NS: Fernwood.
  • Guildford, J. & Morton, S. (eds.) (2010). Making up the State: Women in 20th-Century Atlantic Canada. Fredericton, NB: Acadiensis Press.
  • Guthro, P. (2009). Life histories of Canadian women as active citizens: Implications for policies and practices in adult education. The Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, 21 (2), 19-36.
  • Hammond-Callaghan, M. & Hayday, M. (2008). Mobilizations, protests and engagements: Canadian perspectives on social movements. Halifax, NS: Fernwood.
  • Hill, L.P. (2000). The Raging Grannies: Personal attributes of older women involved in education for social change. Unpublished MA thesis, OISE/University of Toronto.
  • Irving, C., & English, L. M. (2011). Community in cyberspace: Gender, social movement learning and the Internet. Adult Education Quarterly. First published on September 1, 2010 as doi:10.1177/0741713610380448
  • Junor, B. (1995). Greenham Common women’s peace camp: A history of non-violent resistance 1984-1995. London: Working Press.
  • Kaplan, T. (1997). Crazy for democracy: Women in grassroots movements. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Kerans, M.D. (2010). A legacy of love: Remembering Muriel Duckworth—her later years 1996-2009. Halifax, NS: Roseway Publishing.
  • Kerans, M. D. (1996). Muriel Duckworth: A very active pacifist. Halifax, NS: Fernwood Publishing.
  • Lawston, J. M. & Lucas, A. E. (eds.) (2011). Razor wire women: Prisoners, activists, scholars, and artists. Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.
  • Let’s teach about women: The women’s movement in Newfoundland and Labrador, 1970 – 1989. http://www.mun.ca/virt/makingwaves/view_type.php?type=1
  • MacDonald, C. (1986). Adelaide Hoodless: Domestic crusader. Toronto: Dundurn Press.
  • May, E. (2006). How to save the world in your spare time. Toronto: Key Porter Books.
  • McClung, N. (1945). The stream runs fast: My own story. Toronto: Thomas Allen Publishers.
  • Mikula, M. (2005). Women, activism and social change. London: Routledge.
  • Miles, A. (2006). Local activisms, global feminisms and the struggle against globalization. In Medovarski, A. & Cranney, B. (eds.) Canadian Woman Studies: An introductory reader (2nd ed.), pp. 58-64. Toronto: Inanna Publications. Reprinted from Canadian Woman Studies/Les cahiers de la femme, 20 (3), 2000.
  • Naples, N. A. (ed.) (1998). Community activism and feminist politics: Organizing across race, class and gender. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Naples, N. A. & Desai, M. (eds.) (2002). Women’s activism and globalization: Linking local struggles and transnational politics. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Narushima, M. (2004). A gaggle of Raging Grannies: The empowerment of Canadian women through social activism. International Journal of Lifelong Education, 23 (1), 23-42.
  • Neal, R. (1998). Brotherhood economics: Women and co-operatives in Nova Scotia. Sydney, NS: UCCB Press.
  • Rappaport, H. (2001). Encyclopedia of women social reformers. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.
  • Rebelles: 2nd RebELLEs Pan-Canadian Young Feminist Gathering, 2011: http://www.rebelles.org/en/node
  • Rebick, J. (2009). Transforming power: From the personal to the political. Toronto: Penguin Canada.
  • Rebick, J. (2005). Ten thousand roses: The making of a feminist revolution. Toronto: Penguin Canada.
  • Ricciutelli, L., Miles, A. & McFadden, M. (eds.) (2005). Feminist politics, activism and vision: Local and global challenges. London/New York: Zed Books.
  • Robson, W. (2010). Sister to courage: Stories from the world of Viola Desmond, Canada’s Rosa Parks. Wreck Cove, NS: Breton Books.
  • Rowbotham, S. (2010). Dreamers of a new day: Women who invented the twentieth century. London/Brooklyn: Verso Books.
  • Roy, C. (2004). The Raging Grannies: Wild hats, cheeky songs, and witty actions for a better world. Montreal, PQ: Black Rose Books.
  • Singer, J. (2006). Stirring up justice: Writing and reading to change the world. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann.
  • Status of Women, Canada. (2009). The "Famous Five" and the Persons’s Case. http://www.swc-cfc.gc.ca/dates/gg/case-affaire-eng.html
  • Tastsoglou, E. & Welton, M. (1995). "Building a culture of peace": An interview with Muriel Duckworth and Betty Peterson. Canadian Woman Studies/Les cahiers de la femme, 22 (2), 115-119. [http://pi.library.yorku.ca/ojs/index.php/cws/article/view/6497/5685 ]
  • Taylor, S.M. (2007). Green sisters: a spiritual ecology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.
  • Wharton-Zaretsky, M. M. (1999). Black women activists in Toronto from 1950 to 1990. Unpublished doctoral dissertation, University of Toronto.
  • Wine, J. D. & Ristock, J. L. (1991). Women and social change: Feminist activism in Canada. Toronto: James Lorimer and Company.
  • Wyman, M (ed.) (1999). Sweeping the earth: Women taking action for a healthy planet. Charlottetown, PEI: Gynergy Books.

PART II
Women’s voices of experience – more general aspects, with a focus on Canada

  • Anderson, M. & MacDonald, A.-M. (2006). Dropped threads, 3: Beyond the circle. Toronto: Vintage Canada.
  • Cameron, J. D. (2000). "And Martha served": History of the Sisters of St. Martha. Halifax, NS: Nimbus.
  • The Canadian Women's Movement Archives at University of Ottawa (CWMA) http://www.biblio.uottawa.ca/content-page.php?g=en&s=archives&c=src-cwma...
  • Carbert, L. (2006). Rural women’s leadership in Atlantic Canada: First hand perspectives on local public life and participation in electoral politics. Toronto: University of Toronto Press.
  • Colby, A. & Damon, W. (1992). Some do care: Contemporary lives of moral commitment. New York, NY: The Free Press.
  • Cornwall, A. (2007). Spaces for change: the politics of citizen participation in new democratic arenas. London/NY: Zed Books.
  • Cullum, L., McGrath, C., & Porter, M. (eds.) (2006). Weather’s edge: Women in Newfoundland and Labrador – a compendium. St John’s, NL: Killick Press.
  • Daniels, A. K. (1988). Invisible careers: Women civic leaders from the volunteer world. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Franz, C.E. & Stewart, A.J. (eds.) (1994). Women creating lives: Identities, resilience and resistance. Boulder, CO: Westview Press.
  • Gouthro, P.A. (2009). Life histories of Canadian women as active citizens: Implications for policies and practices in adult education. The Canadian Journal for the Study of Adult Education, 21 (2), 19-35.
  • Harris, C.E. (1998). A sense of themselves: Elizabeth Murray’s leadership in school and community. Halifax: Fernwood.
  • Ketusultiek: Original women’s stories of Atlantic Canada (1994). Halifax, NS: Mount Saint Vincent University, Centre for the Study of Women.
  • Les Acadiennes de la Nouvelle-Écosse: des modèles pour le nouveau millénaire. (2000). Dartmouth, N-E.: L’Association des Acadiennes de la Nouvelle-Écosse.
  • McGrath, C., Neis, B. & Porter, M. (eds.) (1995). Their lives and times: Women in Newfoundland and Labrador -- a collage. St. John’s, NL: Killick Press.
  • Nemiroff, G. H. (1999). Women’s changing landscapes: Life stories from three generations. Vancouver, BC: Sumach Press.
  • Riche, N. (ed.) (2002). Dear Sister, Dear Sister: A collection of sisterhood letters from trade union women. Ottawa, ON: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives.
  • Saskatoon Women’s Calendar Collective. "Herstory" annual calendars 1974 + http://www.herstorycalendar.ca/
  • Shields, C. & Anderson, M. (eds.) (2003). Dropped threads, 2: More of what we aren’t told. Toronto: Vintage Canada.
  • Shields, C. & Anderson, M. (eds.) (2001). Dropped threads: What we aren’t told. Toronto: Vintage Canada.
  • White, M. F. (1992). The finest kind: Voices of Newfoundland and Labrador women. St. John’s, NL: Creative Publishers.